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Environ Toxicol. 2015 Sep;30(9):999-1013. doi: 10.1002/tox.21973. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

Aloe vera affects changes induced in pulmonary tissue of mice caused by cigarette smoke inhalation.

Author information

1
Department of Biophysics, Panjab University, Chandigarh, 160014, India.

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine the influence of Aloe vera (AV) on changes induced in pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke (CS) inhaling mice. CS inhalation for 4 weeks caused pulmonary damage as evident by histoarchitectural alterations and enhanced serum and tissue lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities. CS inhalation also led to increased mucin production as revealed by mucicarmine and Alcian Blue-Periodic Acid Schiff (AB-PAS) staining. Studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (balf) of CS exposed animals revealed structural changes in phospholipids and increase in surface tension when compared with control counterparts. These changes were accompanied by enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and differential modulation of antioxidant defense system. AV administration (seven weeks, 500 mg/kg b.w. daily) to CS inhaling mice led to modulation of CS induced pulmonary changes as revealed by lesser degree of histoarchitectural alterations, lesser mucin production, decreased NO levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and serum LDH activity. AV treatment to CS inhaling mice was associated with varying response to antioxidant defense system, however balf of CS + AV treated animals did not exhibit appreciable changes when compared with that of CS exposed animals. These observations suggest that AV has the potential to modulate CS induced changes in the pulmonary tissue which could have implications in management of CS associated pulmonary diseases, however, further investigations are required to explore its complete mechanism of action.

KEYWORDS:

Aloe vera; anti-oxidant defence system; bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; cigarette smoke; mucin; oxidative stress; surface tension

PMID:
24615921
DOI:
10.1002/tox.21973
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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