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Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Mar;11(3):300-9.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2013.11.002. Epub 2014 Mar 6.

Prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in an urban community in China: a cross-sectional analysis of the Shanghai Aging Study.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
  • 2Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
  • 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
  • 4Institute of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: profzhong@sina.com.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Substantial variations in the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have been reported, although mostly in Western countries. Less is known about MCI in the Chinese population.

METHODS:

We clinically and neuropsychologically evaluated 3141 community residents ≥60 years of age. Diagnoses of MCI and its subtypes were made using standard criteria via consensus diagnosis.

RESULTS:

Among 2985 nondemented individuals, 601 were diagnosed with MCI, resulting in a prevalence of 20.1% for total MCI, 13.2% for amnestic MCI (aMCI), and 7.0% for non-amnestic MCI (naMCI). The proportions of MCI subtypes were: aMCI single domain (SD), 38.9%; aMCI multiple domains (MD), 26.5%; naMCI-SD, 25.0%; and naMCI-MD, 9.6%. The prevalence of aMCI-MD increased rapidly with age in women APOE ε4 carriers (from 60 to 69 years to ≥80 years, 3.1%-33.3%, P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that 20% of Chinese elderly are affected by MCI. Prospective studies in China are needed to examine progression to dementia and related risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Cross-sectional; Mild cognitive impairment; Population-based; Prevalence

PMID:
24613707
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2013.11.002
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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