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Nutrition. 2014 Jun;30(6):645-53. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2013.10.024. Epub 2013 Nov 5.

Probiotics, feeding tolerance, and growth: a comparison between HIV-exposed and unexposed very low birth weight infants.

Author information

1
Division Human Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa. Electronic address: Evettev@sun.ac.za.
2
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Division of Neonatology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa.
3
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa.
4
Division Human Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of administration of probiotics on feeding tolerance and growth outcomes of HIV-exposed (but uninfected) versus HIV non-exposed preterm infants. The null hypothesis of this study states that there will be no difference in the feeding tolerance and growth outcomes for both probiotic-exposed and unexposed premature very low birth weight infants.

METHODS:

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted during the period from July 2011 to August 2012. HIV-exposed and non-exposed premature (<34 wk gestation) infants with a birth weight of ≥500 g and ≤1250 g were randomized to receive either a probiotic mixture or placebo. The multispecies probiotic mixture consisted of 1 × 10(9) CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium infantis per day and was administered for 28 d. Anthropometrical parameters, daily intakes, and feeding tolerance were monitored.

RESULTS:

Seventy-four HIV-exposed and 110 unexposed infants were enrolled and randomized (mean birth weight 987 g ± 160 g, range, 560-1244 g; mean gestational age 28.7 wk). In all 4227 probiotic doses were administered (mean 22.9/infant). There was no difference in the average daily weight gain for treatment groups or HIV exposure. The HIV-exposed group achieved significantly higher z scores for length and head circumference at day 28 than the unexposed group (P < 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). There were no differences in the incidence of any signs of feeding intolerance and abdominal distension between the groups.

CONCLUSION:

Probiotic supplementation did not affect growth outcomes or the incidence of any signs of feeding intolerance in HIV exposure.

KEYWORDS:

Anthropometrical parameters; Feeding intolerance; Feeding volume; HIV; Premature infant

PMID:
24613436
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2013.10.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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