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Trends Parasitol. 2014 May;30(5):221-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pt.2014.01.007. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Temperature stress and parasitism of endothermic hosts under climate change.

Author information

1
School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, UK. Electronic address: n.morley@rhul.ac.uk.
2
School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, UK.

Abstract

Climate change is a major threat to global environmental stability and is predicted to cause more frequent extreme weather events with higher levels of heat and cold stress. The physiological effects of such events on parasitic infections within endotherms are poorly studied and rarely considered in the context of climate change where an emphasis on ectothermic components of parasite life cycles (free-living stages and invertebrate hosts or vectors) predominates. However, thermal stress can affect parasite establishment, growth, fecundity, and development within endothermic hosts and may thus potentially influence transmission potential. Such changes can be caused by temperature effects on host physiological homeostasis, predominantly endocrine and immune systems, and may have wide implications for parasite epidemiology under extreme climatic events.

KEYWORDS:

climate change; endocrinology; endotherms; immunology; parasites; physiology

PMID:
24613288
DOI:
10.1016/j.pt.2014.01.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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