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Am J Kidney Dis. 2014 Jul;64(1):123-7. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2014.01.425. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Use of bortezomib in heavy-chain deposition disease: a report of 3 cases.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY.
2
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
3
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
4
Division of Nephrology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY.
5
Department of Cell Biology and Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY.
6
Division of Nephrology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY. Electronic address: pac2004@columbia.edu.

Abstract

Heavy-chain deposition disease (HCDD) is a rare complication of plasma cell dyscrasia in which monoclonal heavy chains deposit in glomerular and tubular basement membranes of the kidney. Clinical and pathologic features of HCDD have been well described in case reports and series, but evidence supporting specific therapies is sparse. Historically, the disease has had a poor prognosis, intensifying the need to clarify optimal treatments. We describe 3 cases of HCDD with biopsy-proven glomerular involvement, severe nephrotic syndrome, and decline in kidney function that were treated successfully with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor. None of these patients had multiple myeloma. In all cases, bortezomib-based therapy resulted in sustained resolution of nephrotic syndrome and improvement in kidney function. All 3 patients developed peripheral neuropathy; otherwise, treatment was well tolerated. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the clinical effectiveness of bortezomib against HCDD.

KEYWORDS:

Heavy-chain deposition disease; bortezomib; monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease; nephrotic syndrome

PMID:
24613055
DOI:
10.1053/j.ajkd.2014.01.425
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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