Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychiatry Res. 2014 May 30;216(3):379-84. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.024. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Anxiety, depression, impulsivity and substance misuse in violent and non-violent adolescent boys in detention in China.

Author information

1
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, Shanghai 200063, China; Mental Health Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Number 139 Renming Road, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China.
2
University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK.
3
Mental Health Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Number 139 Renming Road, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China.
4
Mental Health Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China.
5
Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital, 36 Mingxin Road, Guangzhou 510370, China.
6
Mental Health Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Number 139 Renming Road, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China. Electronic address: xyjw6@aliyun.com.

Abstract

The present investigation aims to identify the factors which differentiate violent from non-violent juvenile offenders, with a particular emphasis on the association between internalizing psychiatric morbidity (i.e. anxiety and depression), impulsivity, substance misuse, and violence. A total of 323 incarcerated male juvenile offenders from one of three Youth Detention Centers (YDCs) in China were recruited between August 2007 and November 2008. Interviews were conducted by trained psychiatrists using the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11), the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), and the Birleson Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) to assess impulsivity, anxiety and depression, respectively. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was also used to assess psychiatric diagnoses. Violent offenders had significantly higher BIS-11 total scores, and attention and nonplanning subscale scores (p<0.05). In the multiple logistic regression model, substance use disorders (SUD) and BIS-11 total scores independently predicted violence. Prison-based treatment services designed to reduce impulsivity and substance misuse in juvenile detention facilities should be prioritized.

KEYWORDS:

Impulsivity; Incarcerated youths; Internalizing and externalizing symptoms; Juvenile offenders; Psychiatric disorders

PMID:
24612970
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center