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Bone. 2014 Jun;63:87-94. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2014.02.018. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Consequences of irradiation on bone and marrow phenotypes, and its relation to disruption of hematopoietic precursors.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5281, USA. Electronic address: DanielleElyseGreen@gmail.com.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5281, USA.

Abstract

The rising levels of radiation exposure, specifically for medical treatments and accidental exposures, have added great concern for the long term risks of bone fractures. Both the bone marrow and bone architecture are devastated following radiation exposure. Even sub-lethal doses cause a deficit to the bone marrow microenvironment, including a decline in hematopoietic cells, and this deficit occurs in a dose dependent fashion. Certain cell phenotypes though are more susceptible to radiation damage, with mesenchymal stem cells being more resilient than the hematopoietic stem cells. The decline in total bone marrow hematopoietic cells is accompanied with elevated adipocytes into the marrow cavity, thereby inhibiting hematopoiesis and recovery of the bone marrow microenvironment. Poor bone marrow is also associated with a decline in bone architectural quality. Therefore, the ability to maintain the bone marrow microenvironment would hinder much of the trabecular bone loss caused by radiation exposure, ultimately decreasing some comorbidities in patients exposed to radiation.

KEYWORDS:

Bone marrow; Cortical bone; Hematopoietic stem cells; Ionizing radiation; Mesenchymal stem cells; Trabecular bone

PMID:
24607941
PMCID:
PMC4005928
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2014.02.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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