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PLoS One. 2014 Mar 6;9(3):e89325. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089325. eCollection 2014.

Associations between two polymorphisms (FokI and BsmI) of vitamin D receptor gene and type 1 diabetes mellitus in Asian population: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology Medicine, Lianyungang First People's Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Lianyungang, China.
2
Department of Endocrinology Medicine, The Fist Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms are possibly involved in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the results to date have been inconclusive. We performed a meta-analysis to examine the association between 2 polymorphisms (FokI and BsmI) of the VDR gene and T1DM in the Asian population.

METHODS:

Literature was retrieved from PubMed, Web of Science, CBM, Embase and Chinese databases. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random or fixed effect model.

RESULTS:

In total, 20 papers (BsmI: 13 studies; FokI: 13 studies) were included. In contrast to the FokI polymorphism, the BsmI polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of T1DM in the Asian population (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.13-1.91, P = 0.004 for B vs. b). Upon stratification by regional geography, an increased risk of T1DM in association with the BsmI polymorphism was observed in the East Asian population (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.38-2.83, P<0.001 for B vs. b), whereas the FokI polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of T1DM in the West Asian population (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12-1.88, P = 0.004 for F vs. f).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our meta-analysis suggests that the BsmI polymorphism may be a risk factor for susceptibility to T1DM in the East Asian population, and the FokI polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of T1DM in the West Asian population. However, because the study size was limited, further studies are essential to confirm our results.

PMID:
24603699
PMCID:
PMC3945782
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0089325
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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