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Death Stud. 2013 Jan;37(1):25-46.

Parental perceptions of siblings' grieving after a childhood cancer death: a longitudinal study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Haematology-Oncology Program, Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. maru.barrera@sickkids.ca
2
Department of Psychology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Survivorship Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
5
Department of Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

We investigated longitudinally parental perceptions of siblings' bereavement after childhood cancer death. Parents were interviewed 6 months (n = 25) and 18 months (n = 75) post-death. Data are analyzed combined and over time. The following themes emerged: (a) expression of grief missing deceased child (verbally, crying), behavioral problems, difficulty understanding the meaning of death (pre-schoolers), and avoiding talking with parents about feelings (adolescents); (b) what helps siblings grief moving on, talking about deceased child and social support; (c) relationship with parents improved for most siblings; and (d) bond with deceased sibling: pretend-play (preschoolers), dreaming, and career choices (adolescents). Over time, themes reflected stability and change.

PMID:
24600719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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