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PLoS One. 2014 Mar 5;9(3):e90624. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090624. eCollection 2014.

Molecular comparison and evolutionary analyses of VP1 nucleotide sequences of new African human enterovirus 71 isolates reveal a wide genetic diversity.

Author information

1
Aix Marseille Univ, IRD French Institute of Research for Development, EHESP French School of Public Health, UMR_D 190 "Emergence des Pathologies Virales", Marseille, France.
2
Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Unité de Virologie, Antananarivo, Madagascar.
3
Institut Pasteur, Unité de biologie des virus entériques, Paris, France; INSERM U994, Paris, France.
4
Enterovirus Research Centre, Mumbai, India.
5
Aix Marseille Univ, IRD French Institute of Research for Development, EHESP French School of Public Health, UMR_D 190 "Emergence des Pathologies Virales", Marseille, France; Lao-Oxford-Mahosot Hospital-Wellcome Trust Research Unit, Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Lao PDR; Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
6
Institut Pasteur, Unité de biologie des virus entériques, Paris, France.
7
Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, EPIE EA4843, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

Abstract

Most circulating strains of Human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) have been classified primarily into three genogroups (A to C) on the basis of genetic divergence between the 1D gene, which encodes the VP1 capsid protein. The aim of the present study was to provide further insights into the diversity of the EV-A71 genogroups following the recent description of highly divergent isolates, in particular those from African countries, including Madagascar. We classified recent EV-A71 isolates by a large comparison of 3,346 VP1 nucleotidic sequences collected from GenBank. Analysis of genetic distances and phylogenetic investigations indicated that some recently-reported isolates did not fall into the genogroups A-C and clustered into three additional genogroups, including one Indian genogroup (genogroup D) and 2 African ones (E and F). Our Bayesian phylogenetic analysis provided consistent data showing that the genogroup D isolates share a recent common ancestor with the members of genogroup E, while the isolates of genogroup F evolved from a recent common ancestor shared with the members of the genogroup B. Our results reveal the wide diversity that exists among EV-A71 isolates and suggest that the number of circulating genogroups is probably underestimated, particularly in developing countries where EV-A71 epidemiology has been poorly studied.

PMID:
24598878
PMCID:
PMC3944068
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0090624
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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