Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lung Cancer. 2014 May;84(2):145-50. doi: 10.1016/j.lungcan.2014.02.002. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung is associated with the upper lung regions.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 89 Beaumont Avenue, Burlington VT 05405, United States.
2
Department of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, United States; Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
5
Department of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
6
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, United States.
7
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, United States.
8
Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, United States.
9
Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
10
Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, United States; Departments of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, United States. Electronic address: dchris@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We postulated that ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) relationships within the lung might influence where lung cancer occurs. To address this hypothesis we evaluated the location of lung adenocarcinoma, by both tumor lobe and superior-inferior regional distribution, and associated variables such as emphysema.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

One hundred fifty-nine cases of invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features were visually evaluated to identify lobar or regional tumor location. Regions were determined by automated division of the lungs into three equal volumes: (upper region, middle region, or lower region). Automated densitometry was used to measure radiographic emphysema.

RESULTS:

The majority of invasive adenocarcinomas occurred in the upper lobes (69%), with 94% of upper lobe adenocarcinomas occurring in the upper region of the lung. The distribution of adenocarcinoma, when classified as upper or lower lobe, was not different between invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features (formerly bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma, P = 0.08). Regional distribution of tumor was significantly different between invasive adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with lepidic features (P = 0.001). Logistic regression analysis with the outcome of invasive adenocarcinoma histology was used to adjust for confounders. Tumor region continued to be a significant predictor (OR 8.5, P = 0.008, compared to lower region), whereas lobar location of tumor was not (P = 0.09). In stratified analysis, smoking was not associated with region of invasive adenocarcinoma occurrence (P = 0.089). There was no difference in total emphysema scores between invasive adenocarcinoma cases occurring in each of the three regions (P = 0.155). There was also no difference in the distribution of region of adenocarcinoma occurrence between quartiles of emphysema (P = 0.217).

CONCLUSION:

Invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung is highly associated with the upper lung regions. This association is not related to smoking, history of COPD, or total emphysema. The regional distribution of invasive adenocarcinoma may be due to V/Q relationships or other local factors.

KEYWORDS:

Emphysema; Non-small cell lung cancer; Tumor location

PMID:
24598367
PMCID:
PMC4004700
DOI:
10.1016/j.lungcan.2014.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center