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Laryngorhinootologie. 2014 Aug;93(8):521-7. doi: 10.1055/s-0033-1363691. Epub 2014 Mar 3.

[Children with specific language impairment: electrophysiological and pedaudiological findings].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Zukunftskolleg/Fachbereich Sprachwissenschaft, Universität Konstanz, Konstanz.
2
Transferzentrum für Neurowissenschaften und Lernen, Universitätsklinik Ulm, Ulm.
3
Sektion für Phoniatrie & Pädaudiologie, Univ- HNO Klinik, Ulm.
4
Department of Signal Processing and Acoustics, Aalto University, Helsinki.
5
Kognitive Elektrophysiologie/Abteilung Psychiatrie, Universitätsklinik Ulm, Ulm.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Auditory deficits may be at the core of the language delay in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). It was therefore hypothesized that children with SLI perform poorly on 4 tests typically used to diagnose central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) as well in the processing of phonetic and tone stimuli in an electrophysiological experiment.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

14 children with SLI (mean age 61,7 months) and 16 children without SLI (mean age 64,9 months) were tested with 4 tasks: non-word repetition, language discrimination in noise, directional hearing, and dichotic listening. The electrophysiological recording Mismatch Negativity (MMN) employed sine tones (600 vs. 650 Hz) and phonetic stimuli (/ε/ versus /e/).

RESULTS:

Control children and children with SLI differed significantly in the non-word repetition as well as in the dichotic listening task but not in the two other tasks. Only the control children recognized the frequency difference in the MMN-experiment. The phonetic difference was discriminated by both groups, however, effects were longer lasting for the control children. Group differences were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with SLI show limitations in auditory processing that involve either a complex task repeating unfamiliar or difficult material and show subtle deficits in auditory processing at the neural level.

PMID:
24590386
DOI:
10.1055/s-0033-1363691
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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