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Prev Med. 2014 Jun;63:6-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.02.018. Epub 2014 Feb 28.

The association between demographic and behavioral characteristics and sunburn among U.S. adults - National Health Interview Survey, 2010.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mailstop F-76, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. Electronic address: dholman@cdc.gov.
2
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mailstop F-76, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. Electronic address: zab3@cdc.gov.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mailstop F-76, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. Electronic address: irm2@cdc.gov.
4
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Control & Population Sciences, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: hartmana@mail.nih.gov.
5
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Control & Population Sciences, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: pernafm@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between demographic and behavioral characteristics and sunburn among U.S. adults.

METHOD:

We used 2010 National Health Interview Survey data (N=24,970) to conduct multivariable logistic regressions examining associations with having 1 or more sunburns in the past year and having 4 or more sunburns in the past year.

RESULTS:

Overall, 37.1% of adults experienced sunburn in the past year. The adjusted prevalence of sunburn was particularly common among adults aged 18-29years (52.0%), those who repeatedly burn or freckle after 2weeks in the sun (45.9%), whites (44.3%), indoor tanners (44.1%), those with a family history of melanoma (43.9%), and those who are US-born (39.5%). Physical activity, alcohol consumption, and overweight/obesity were positively associated with sunburn (all P<0.001); sun protection behaviors were not significantly associated with sunburn (P=0.35). Among those who were sunburned in the past year, 12.1% experienced 4 or more sunburns.

CONCLUSION:

Sunburn is common, particularly among younger adults, those with a more sun-sensitive skin type, whites, those with a family history of melanoma, the highly physically active, and indoor tanners. Efforts are needed to facilitate sun-safety during outdoor recreation, improve the consistency of sun protection practices, and prevent sunburn, particularly among these subgroups.

KEYWORDS:

Adult; Health behavior; Primary prevention; Skin neoplasms; Sunburn

PMID:
24589442
PMCID:
PMC4535173
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.02.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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