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Sleep. 2014 Mar 1;37(3):613-20. doi: 10.5665/sleep.3510.

Childhood sleep duration and quality in relation to leptin concentration in two cohort studies.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA ; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
2
Statistical Research Consultants, LLC, Schaumburg, IL.
3
Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ; Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA ; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ; Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
4
Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA ; Departments of Pediatrics and Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

Poor sleep in childhood is associated with increased obesity risk, possibly by affecting appetite-regulating hormones such as leptin. We examined short- and long-term sleep duration and quality in relation to leptin in two US pediatric cohorts.

DESIGN:

Analysis of data from two prospective cohort studies.

SETTING:

Population-based. Adolescent polysomnography assessments performed in a clinical research unit.

PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS:

Children in Project Viva (n = 655) and adolescents in the Cleveland Children's Sleep & Health Study (n = 502).

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

In Project Viva, mothers reported average child sleep duration annually from infancy through age 7, and we measured leptin at ages 3 and 7. In the Cleveland Children's Sleep & Health Study, we collected self-reported sleep duration, polysomnography-derived measures of sleep quality, and fasting leptin at ages 16-19. In sex-stratified linear regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and adiposity, chronic curtailed sleep was associated with lower leptin at age 7 in girls; a one-unit decrease in sleep score was associated with a 0.08 decrease in log leptin (95% CI: 0.01,0.15). The association was stronger in girls with greater adiposity (P = 0.01). Among adolescents, shorter sleep was associated with lower leptin in males; each one-hour decrease in sleep duration was associated with a 0.06 decrease in log leptin (95% CI: 0.00, 0.11). Sleep duration was not associated with leptin at other ages. Sleep quality indices were not associated with leptin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest possible age-specific sexual dimorphism in the influence of sleep on leptin, which may partly explain inconsistencies in the literature.

KEYWORDS:

Sleep; leptin; obesity; youth

PMID:
24587585
PMCID:
PMC3920328
DOI:
10.5665/sleep.3510
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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