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PLoS One. 2014 Feb 28;9(2):e89944. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089944. eCollection 2014.

Hospital presenting self-harm and risk of fatal and non-fatal repetition: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Non-fatal self-harm is one of the most frequent reasons for emergency hospital admission and the strongest risk factor for subsequent suicide. Repeat self-harm and suicide are key clinical outcomes of the hospital management of self-harm. We have undertaken a comprehensive review of the international literature on the incidence of fatal and non-fatal repeat self-harm and investigated factors influencing variation in these estimates as well as changes in the incidence of repeat self-harm and suicide over the last 30 years.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, article reference lists and personal paper collections of the authors were searched for studies describing rates of fatal and non-fatal self-harm amongst people who presented to health care services for deliberate self-harm. Heterogeneity in pooled estimates of repeat self-harm incidence was investigated using stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression. The search identified 177 relevant papers. The risk of suicide in the 12 months after an index attempt was 1.6% (CI 1.2-2.4) and 3.9% (CI 3.2-4.8) after 5 years. The estimated 1 year rate of non-fatal repeat self-harm was 16.3% (CI 15.1-17.7). This proportion was considerably lower in Asian countries (10.0%, CI 7.3-13.6%) and varies between studies identifying repeat episodes using hospital admission data (13.7%, CI 12.3-15.3) and studies using patient report (21.9%, CI 14.3-32.2). There was no evidence that the incidence of repeat self-harm was lower in more recent (post 2000) studies compared to those from the 1980s and 1990s.

CONCLUSIONS:

One in 25 patients presenting to hospital for self-harm will kill themselves in the next 5 years. The incidence of repeat self-harm and suicide in this population has not changed in over 10 years. Different methods of identifying repeat episodes of self-harm produce varying estimates of incidence and this heterogeneity should be considered when evaluating interventions aimed at reducing non-fatal repeat self-harm.

PMID:
24587141
PMCID:
PMC3938547
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0089944
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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