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PLoS One. 2014 Feb 26;9(2):e89596. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089596. eCollection 2014.

Highly immunoreactive IgG antibodies directed against a set of twenty human proteins in the sera of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identified by protein array.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Proteomics/Bioanalytics, Medizinisches Proteom-Center, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
2
Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
3
St. Josef-Hospital, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
4
Department of Medical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.
5
Institute of Clinical Microbiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.
6
Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary.
7
Department of Neurology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.
8
Department of Medical Proteomics/Bioanalytics, Medizinisches Proteom-Center, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany ; Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Dortmund, Germany.

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common adult-onset motor neuron disorder, is characterized by the progressive and selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Diagnosis of this disorder is based on clinical assessment, and the average survival time is less than 3 years. Injections of IgG from ALS patients into mice are known to specifically mark motor neurons. Moreover, IgG has been found in upper and lower motor neurons in ALS patients. These results led us to perform a case-control study using human protein microarrays to identify the antibody profiles of serum samples from 20 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We demonstrated high levels of 20 IgG antibodies that distinguished the patients from the controls. These findings suggest that a panel of antibodies may serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker for ALS.

PMID:
24586901
PMCID:
PMC3935926
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0089596
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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