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PLoS One. 2014 Feb 19;9(2):e88921. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088921. eCollection 2014.

Extremely low frequency magnetic field (50 Hz, 0.5 mT) reduces oxidative stress in the brain of gerbils submitted to global cerebral ischemia.

Author information

1
Institute for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
2
Institute for Medical Research, Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, Serbia.
3
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

Abstract

Magnetic field as ecological factor has influence on all living beings. The aim of this study was to determine if extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF, 50 Hz, 0.5 mT) affects oxidative stress in the brain of gerbils submitted to 10-min global cerebral ischemia. After occlusion of both carotid arteries, 3-month-old gerbils were continuously exposed to ELF-MF for 7 days. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion production, superoxide dismutase activity and index of lipid peroxidation were examined in the forebrain cortex, striatum and hippocampus on the 7(th) (immediate effect of ELF-MF) and 14(th) day after reperfusion (delayed effect of ELF-MF). Ischemia per se increased oxidative stress in the brain on the 7(th) and 14(th) day after reperfusion. ELF-MF also increased oxidative stress, but to a greater extent than ischemia, only immediately after cessation of exposure. Ischemic gerbils exposed to ELF-MF had increased oxidative stress parameters on the 7(th) day after reperfusion, but to a lesser extent than ischemic or ELF-MF-exposed animals. On the 14(th) day after reperfusion, oxidative stress parameters in the brain of these gerbils were mostly at the control levels. Applied ELF-MF decreases oxidative stress induced by global cerebral ischemia and thereby reduces possible negative consequences which free radical species could have in the brain. The results presented here indicate a beneficial effect of ELF-MF (50 Hz, 0.5 mT) in the model of global cerebral ischemia.

PMID:
24586442
PMCID:
PMC3929496
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0088921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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