Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2014 Feb 19;9(2):e88896. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088896. eCollection 2014.

Long-term effects of gestational nicotine exposure and food-restriction on gene expression in the striatum of adolescent rats.

Author information

1
Medical Research Council (MRC), Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom ; Computational Genomics Analysis and Training (CGAT), Medical Research Council (MRC) Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
2
Department of addictions, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom, ; Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
3
Medical Research Council (MRC), Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom ; University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
4
Medical Research Council (MRC), Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Departamento de Psicologia do Desenvolvimento e da Personalidade, Instituto de Psicologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre-RS, Brazil.
6
Department of addictions, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Gestational exposure to environmental toxins such as nicotine may result in detectable gene expression changes in later life. To investigate the direct toxic effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on later brain development, we have used transcriptomic analysis of striatal samples to identify gene expression differences between adolescent Lister Hooded rats exposed to nicotine in utero and controls. Using an additional group of animals matched for the reduced food intake experienced in the nicotine group, we were also able to assess the impact of imposed food-restriction on gene expression profiles. We found little evidence for a role of gestational nicotine exposure on altered gene expression in the striatum of adolescent offspring at a significance level of p<0.01 and |log2 fold change >0.5|, although we cannot exclude the possibility of nicotine-induced changes in other brain regions, or at other time points. We did, however, find marked gene expression differences in response to imposed food-restriction. Food-restriction resulted in significant group differences for a number of immediate early genes (IEGs) including Fos, Fosb, Fosl2, Arc, Junb, Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. These genes are associated with stress response pathways and therefore may reflect long-term effects of nutritional deprivation on the development of the stress system.

PMID:
24586432
PMCID:
PMC3929494
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0088896
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center