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Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2015 Jan;29(1):25-32. doi: 10.1177/1545968314524631. Epub 2014 Feb 28.

An international age- and gender-controlled model for the Spinal Cord Injury Ability Realization Measurement Index (SCI-ARMI).

Author information

1
IRCCS S Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy.
2
North West Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, UK.
3
University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
4
Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
5
Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel.
6
Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel.
7
Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
8
Montecatone Rehabilitation Institute, Imola (BO), Italy.
9
Institut Guttmann, Hospital de Neurorehabilitació, Institut Universitari adscrit a la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
10
UOC A S Unità Spinale Unipolare, Ospedale CTO, Rome, Italy.
11
Midlands Centre for Spinal Injuries, Oswestry, UK.
12
Centro de Medicina de Reabilitação da Região Centro-Rovisco Pais (CMRRC-RP) Tocha, Portugal.
13
Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel amcatz@post.tau.ac.il.

Abstract

Background. A quadratic formula of the Spinal Cord Injury Ability Realization Measurement Index (SCI-ARMI) has previously been published. This formula was based on a model of Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM95), the 95th percentile of the SCIM III values, which correspond with the American Spinal Injury Association Motor Scores (AMS) of SCI patients. Objective. To further develop the original formula. Setting. Spinal cord injury centers from 6 countries and the Statistical Laboratory, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Methods. SCIM95 of 661 SCI patients was modeled, using a quantile regression with or without adjustment for age and gender, to calculate SCI-ARMI values. SCI-ARMI gain during rehabilitation and its correlations were examined. Results. A new quadratic SCIM95 model was created. This resembled the previously published model, which yielded similar SCIM95 values in all the countries, after adjustment for age and gender. Without this adjustment, however, only 86% of the non-Israeli SCIM III observations were lower than those SCIM95 values (P < .0001). Adding the variables age and gender to the new model affected the SCIM95 value significantly (P < .04). Adding country information did not add a significant effect (P > .1). SCI-ARMI gain was positive (38.8 ± 22 points, P < .0001) and correlated weakly with admission age and AMS. Conclusions. The original quadratic SCI-ARMI formula is valid for an international population after adjustment for age and gender. The new formula considers more factors that affect functional ability following SCI.

KEYWORDS:

AIS motor scores; SCI-ARMI; SCIM; spinal cord injury; spinal cord lesion

PMID:
24585943
DOI:
10.1177/1545968314524631
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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