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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Jun;95(6):1127-34. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.02.007. Epub 2014 Feb 25.

Massage therapy restores peripheral vascular function after exertion.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Integrative Physiology Laboratory, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Integrative Physiology Laboratory, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: shanep@uic.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if lower extremity exercise-induced muscle injury reduces vascular endothelial function of the upper extremity and if massage therapy (MT) improves peripheral vascular function after exertion-induced muscle injury.

DESIGN:

Randomized, blinded trial with evaluations at 90 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours.

SETTING:

Clinical research center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sedentary young adults (N=36) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) exertion-induced muscle injury and MT (n=15; mean age ± SE, 26.6 ± 0.3); (2) exertion-induced muscle injury only (n=10; mean age ± SE, 23.6 ± 0.4), and (3) MT only (n=11; mean age ± SE, 25.5 ± 0.4).

INTERVENTION:

Participants were assigned to exertion-induced muscle injury only (a single bout of bilateral, eccentric leg press exercise), MT only (30-min lower extremity massage using Swedish technique), or exertion-induced muscle injury and MT.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was determined by ultrasound at each time point. Nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced dilation was also assessed (0.4 mg).

RESULTS:

Brachial FMD increased from baseline in the exertion-induced muscle injury and MT group and the MT only group (7.38%±.18% to 9.02%±.28%, P<.05 and 7.77%±.25% to 10.2%±.22%, P<.05, respectively) at 90 minutes and remained elevated until 72 hours. In the exertion-induced muscle injury only group, FMD was reduced from baseline at 24 and 48 hours (7.78%±.14% to 6.75%±.11%, P<.05 and 6.53%±.11%, P<.05, respectively) and returned to baseline after 72 hours. Dilations of NTG were similar over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that MT attenuates impairment of upper extremity endothelial function resulting from lower extremity exertion-induced muscle injury in sedentary young adults.

KEYWORDS:

Endothelium; Exercise; Massage; Rehabilitation

PMID:
24583315
PMCID:
PMC4037335
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2014.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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