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Mol Cell Probes. 2014 Aug;28(4):167-74. doi: 10.1016/j.mcp.2014.02.003. Epub 2014 Feb 27.

Foodborne anisakiasis and allergy.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia; Centre of Biosecurity and Tropical Infectious Diseases, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia; Centre for Biodiscovery and Molecular Development of Therapeutics, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia.
2
Department of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia.
3
School of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia; Centre of Biosecurity and Tropical Infectious Diseases, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia; Centre for Biodiscovery and Molecular Development of Therapeutics, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia. Electronic address: andreas.lopata@jcu.edu.au.

Abstract

Human anisakiasis, a disease caused by Anisakis spp. (Nematoda), is often associated with clinical signs that are similar to those associated with bacterial or viral gastroenteritis. With the globalisation of the seafood industry, the risk of humans acquiring anisakiasis in developed countries appears to be underestimated. The importance of this disease is not only in its initial manifestation, which can often become chronic if the immune response does not eliminate the worm, but, importantly, in its subsequent sensitisation of the human patient. This sensitisation to Anisakis-derived allergens can put the patient at risk of an allergic exacerbation upon secondary exposure. This article reviews some aspects of this food-borne disease and explains its link to chronic, allergic conditions in humans.

KEYWORDS:

Allergen; Allergy; Anisakiasis; Anisakis; Fish; Food-borne parasite; Nematode

PMID:
24583228
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcp.2014.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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