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Psychiatry Res. 2014 May 15;216(2):206-12. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.023. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Facial emotion perception differs in young persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis.

Author information

1
University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychiatry, Philadelphia, PA, United States. Electronic address: kohler@upenn.edu.
2
University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychiatry, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
3
University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychiatry, Philadelphia, PA, United States; Children׳s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
4
University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychiatry, Philadelphia, PA, United States; The Philadelphia Veterans Administration Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, United States.

Abstract

A large body of literature has documented facial emotion perception impairments in schizophrenia. More recently, emotion perception has been investigated in persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis. This study compared emotion perception abilities in groups of young persons with schizophrenia, clinical high-risk, genetic risk and healthy controls. Groups, ages 13-25, included 24 persons at clinical high-risk, 52 first-degree relatives at genetic risk, 91 persons with schizophrenia and 90 low risk persons who completed computerized testing of emotion recognition and differentiation. Groups differed by overall emotion recognition abilities and recognition of happy, sad, anger and fear expressions. Pairwise comparisons revealed comparable impairments in recognition of happy, angry, and fearful expressions for persons at clinical high-risk and schizophrenia, while genetic risk participants were less impaired, showing reduced recognition of fearful expressions. Groups also differed for differentiation of happy and sad expressions, but differences were mainly between schizophrenia and control groups. Emotion perception impairments are observable in young persons at-risk for psychosis. Preliminary results with clinical high-risk participants, when considered along findings in genetic risk relatives, suggest social cognition abilities to reflect pathophysiological processes involved in risk of schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical high-risk for psychosis; Emotion differentiation; Emotion recognition; Genetic risk; Schizophrenia

PMID:
24582775
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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