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J Pediatr. 2014 May;164(5):1051-1057.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.01.037. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Maternal influenza vaccine and risks for preterm or small for gestational age birth.

Author information

1
HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research, Minneapolis, MN.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the impact of influenza vaccine administered to pregnant women during all trimesters on the rates of preterm and small for gestational age (SGA) births, evaluating both increased and decreased risk.

STUDY DESIGN:

This retrospective observational matched cohort study involved 7 Vaccine Safety Datalink sites across the US for the 2004-05 through 2008-09 influenza seasons. Cohort eligibility and outcomes were determined from administrative, claims, medical records, and birth data. In propensity score- and vaccine exposure time-matched analyses, ORs for preterm and SGA births were calculated.

RESULTS:

Among 57 554 matched vaccinated and unvaccinated pregnant women, including 16 240 women in the first trimester, maternal vaccination was not associated with increased or decreased risk for preterm birth (OR for delivery at <37 weeks gestation, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.93-1.02]; for delivery at ≤32 weeks gestation, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.86-1.12]; and for delivery at ≤34 weeks gestation, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.88-1.04]) or SGA birth (OR for <5th percentile weight for gestational age, 1.02 [95% CI, 0.96-1.09], and for <10th percentile weight for gestational age, 1.00 [95% CI, 0.96-1.04]). Similarly, first trimester vaccination was not associated with increased or decreased risk for preterm or SGA birth.

CONCLUSION:

Receipt of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased or decreased risk of preterm or SGA birth. These findings support the safety of vaccinating pregnant women against influenza during the first, second, and third trimesters, and suggest that a nonspecific protective effect of the influenza vaccine for these outcomes does not exist.

PMID:
24582484
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.01.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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