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J Diabetes Complications. 2014 Jul-Aug;28(4):500-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.11.010. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

Lean versus obese diabetes mellitus patients in the United States minority population.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, John H. Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County and Rush University Medical Center.
2
Section of Endocrinology, University of Chicago.
3
Division of Endocrinology, John H. Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County and Rush University Medical Center. Electronic address: lfogelfe@cchil.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify special characteristics in large group of lean diabetes minority patients in comparison to obese type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

1784 Lean (BMI <25) diabetes patients were identified and compared with 8630 obese (BMI ≥30) patients. Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (N=523) were excluded. Patient data, including demographics, psychosocial factors, insulin use, and complications was analyzed.

RESULTS:

In lean compared to obese, there was male predominance (62% vs 48%, p<0.001), higher prevalence of insulin use (49% vs 44%, p=0.001), lower TG/HDL (2.28 vs 3.4, p<0.001), and higher prevalence of alcoholism (5.7% vs 2.4%, p<0.001) and pancreatitis (3.6% vs 0.9%, p<0.001). In both groups, African Americans and Latinos were the prevalent ethnicities (38%, 34% vs. 53%,31%). When comparing patients within the lean group who were on insulin (49%) to those on oral medications, there were more males (65% vs. 59%, p<0.001), earlier age of onset (40±14 vs. 47±12, p<0.001), lower BMI (22.1±2 vs. 22.6±1.7, p<0.001) and lower TG/HDL (2.18 vs. 2.42, p=0.021).

CONCLUSIONS:

A subset of diabetes patients in the United States minority population are lean and may have rapid beta cell failure. The etiology is not clear and acquired factors, genetics, and autoimmunity may be contributory.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes in minorities; Lean diabetes; Pancreatitis

PMID:
24581791
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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