Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Hum Genet. 2014 Mar 6;94(3):385-94. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.01.018. Epub 2014 Feb 27.

Loss of α1β1 soluble guanylate cyclase, the major nitric oxide receptor, leads to moyamoya and achalasia.

Author information

1
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1161, 75010 Paris, France; UMR-S1161, Génétique des Maladies Vasculaires, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75010 Paris, France; Service de Neurologie, Centre de Référence des Maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Oeil, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75010 Paris, France.
2
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1161, 75010 Paris, France; UMR-S1161, Génétique des Maladies Vasculaires, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75010 Paris, France.
3
Service de Pédiatrie, Etablissement Public Hospitalier Hassen Badi el Harrach, 16200 Alger, Algeria.
4
Service de Neurochirurgie, Groupe Hospitalier Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75015 Paris, France.
5
Centre National de Référence de l'AVC de l'Enfant, Service de Médecine Physique et Réadaptation Pédiatrique, Hôpital Bellevue, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Etienne, 42100 Saint-Etienne, France.
6
Centre de Pathologie Est, Hôpital Mère-Enfant, 69500 Lyon, France.
7
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U770, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; Université Paris Sud, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.
8
Service d'Ophtalmologie, Centre de Référence des Maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Oeil, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75010 Paris, France.
9
Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre de Référence des Maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Oeil, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75010 Paris, France.
10
Service de Réanimation Pédiatrique et Néonatalogie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Etienne, 42100 Saint Etienne, France.
11
Service de Physiologie Digestive, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon I, 69003 Lyon, France.
12
Service de Neuropédiatrie, Groupe Hospitalier Robert Debré, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75019 Paris, France.
13
Service de Génétique Moléculaire Neurovasculaire, Centre de Référence des Maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Oeil, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75010 Paris, France.
14
Service de Gastroentérologie, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75010 Paris, France.
15
VIB Inflammation Research Center, Ghent University, 9052 Ghent, Belgium.
16
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1161, 75010 Paris, France; UMR-S1161, Génétique des Maladies Vasculaires, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75010 Paris, France; Service de Génétique Moléculaire Neurovasculaire, Centre de Référence des Maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Oeil, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, 75010 Paris, France. Electronic address: tournier-lasserve@univ-paris-diderot.fr.

Erratum in

  • Am J Hum Genet. 2014 Apr 3;94(4):642.

Abstract

Moyamoya is a cerebrovascular condition characterized by a progressive stenosis of the terminal part of the internal carotid arteries (ICAs) and the compensatory development of abnormal "moyamoya" vessels. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this condition, which leads to ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, remain unknown. It can occur as an isolated cerebral angiopathy (so-called moyamoya disease) or in association with various conditions (moyamoya syndromes). Here, we describe an autosomal-recessive disease leading to severe moyamoya and early-onset achalasia in three unrelated families. This syndrome is associated in all three families with homozygous mutations in GUCY1A3, which encodes the α1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the major receptor for nitric oxide (NO). Platelet analysis showed a complete loss of the soluble α1β1 guanylate cyclase and showed an unexpected stimulatory role of sGC within platelets. The NO-sGC-cGMP pathway is a major pathway controlling vascular smooth-muscle relaxation, vascular tone, and vascular remodeling. Our data suggest that alterations of this pathway might lead to an abnormal vascular-remodeling process in sensitive vascular areas such as ICA bifurcations. These data provide treatment options for affected individuals and strongly suggest that investigation of GUCY1A3 and other members of the NO-sGC-cGMP pathway is warranted in both isolated early-onset achalasia and nonsyndromic moyamoya.

PMID:
24581742
PMCID:
PMC3951937
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center