Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell. 2014 Feb 27;156(5):1096-111. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.02.023.

Neural networks of the mouse neocortex.

Author information

1
Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA.
2
Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA.
3
Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA.
4
Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA; Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA. Electronic address: Hongwei.Dong@loni.usc.edu.

Abstract

Numerous studies have examined the neuronal inputs and outputs of many areas within the mammalian cerebral cortex, but how these areas are organized into neural networks that communicate across the entire cortex is unclear. Over 600 labeled neuronal pathways acquired from tracer injections placed across the entire mouse neocortex enabled us to generate a cortical connectivity atlas. A total of 240 intracortical connections were manually reconstructed within a common neuroanatomic framework, forming a cortico-cortical connectivity map that facilitates comparison of connections from different cortical targets. Connectivity matrices were generated to provide an overview of all intracortical connections and subnetwork clusterings. The connectivity matrices and cortical map revealed that the entire cortex is organized into four somatic sensorimotor, two medial, and two lateral subnetworks that display unique topologies and can interact through select cortical areas. Together, these data provide a resource that can be used to further investigate cortical networks and their corresponding functions.

PMID:
24581503
PMCID:
PMC4169118
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.02.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center