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Cell. 2014 Feb 27;156(5):1084-95. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.01.013.

Reciprocal encoding of signal intensity and duration in a glucose-sensing circuit.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
2
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
3
Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: timothy_elston@med.unc.edu.
4
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: alan_jones@unc.edu.

Abstract

Cells continuously adjust their behavior in response to changing environmental conditions. Both intensity and duration of external signals are critical factors in determining what response is initiated. To understand how intracellular signaling networks process such multidimensional information, we studied the AtRGS1-mediated glucose response system of Arabidopsis. By combining experiments with mathematical modeling, we discovered a reciprocal dose and duration response relying on the orchestrated action of three kinases (AtWNK1, AtWNK8, and AtWNK10) acting on distinct timescales and activation thresholds. Specifically, we find that high concentrations of D-glucose rapidly signal through AtWNK8 and AtWNK10, whereas low, sustained sugar concentration slowly activate the pathway through AtWNK1, allowing the cells to respond similarly to transient, high-intensity signals and sustained, low-intensity signals. This "dose-duration reciprocity" allows encoding of both the intensity and persistence of glucose as an important energy resource and signaling molecule.

PMID:
24581502
PMCID:
PMC4364031
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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