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Cell. 2014 Feb 27;156(5):1060-71. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.044.

Multimodal integration of carbon dioxide and other sensory cues drives mosquito attraction to humans.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
2
School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitative Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia.
3
Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Electronic address: leslie.vosshall@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

Multiple sensory cues emanating from humans are thought to guide blood-feeding female mosquitoes to a host. To determine the relative contribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) detection to mosquito host-seeking behavior, we mutated the AaegGr3 gene, a subunit of the heteromeric CO2 receptor in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Gr3 mutants lack electrophysiological and behavioral responses to CO2. These mutants also fail to show CO2-evoked responses to heat and lactic acid, a human-derived attractant, suggesting that CO2 can gate responses to other sensory stimuli. Whereas attraction of Gr3 mutants to live humans in a large semi-field environment was only slightly impaired, responses to an animal host were greatly reduced in a spatial-scale-dependent manner. Synergistic integration of heat and odor cues likely drive host-seeking behavior in the absence of CO2 detection. We reveal a networked series of interactions by which multimodal integration of CO2, human odor, and heat orchestrates mosquito attraction to humans.

PMID:
24581501
PMCID:
PMC4007582
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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