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Am J Occup Ther. 2014 Mar-Apr;68(2):149-58. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2014.009365.

Effects of weighted vests on attention, impulse control, and on-task behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Author information

1
Hung-Yu Lin, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
2
Posen Lee, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, I-Shou University, No. 8 Yida Road, Jiau-Shu Village, Yanchao District, Kaohsiung City 824, Taiwan; posenlee@isu.edu.tw.
3
Wen-Dien Chang, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Sports Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
4
Fu-Yuan Hong, PhD, is Associate Professor, Center for General Education, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In this study, we examined the effectiveness of using weighted vests for improving attention, impulse control, and on-task behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHOD:

In a randomized, two-period crossover design, 110 children with ADHD were measured using the Conners' Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II) task.

RESULTS:

In the weighted vest condition, the participants did show significant improvement in all three attentional variables of the CPT-II task, including inattention; speed of processing and responding; consistency of executive management; and three of four on-task behaviors, including off task, out of seat, and fidgets. No significant improvements in impulse control and automatic vocalizations were found.

CONCLUSION:

Although wearing a weighted vest is not a cure-all strategy, our findings support the use of the weighted vest to remedy attentional and on-task behavioral problems of children with ADHD.

PMID:
24581401
DOI:
10.5014/ajot.2014.009365
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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