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Soc Sci Med. 2014 Mar;104:31-40. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.12.003. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

Comparing tailored and narrative worksite interventions at increasing colonoscopy adherence in adults 50-75: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
University of Utah, USA. Electronic address: jakob.jensen@utah.edu.
2
Texas Tech University, USA.
3
University of Miami, USA.
4
University of Utah, USA.
5
Purdue University, USA.

Abstract

Research has identified several communication strategies that could increase adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. Two promising strategies are tailoring and narrative-based approaches. Tailoring is the personalization of information based on individual characteristics. Narrative-based approaches use stories about similar others to counter perceived barriers and cultivate self-efficacy. To compare these two approaches, a randomized controlled trial was carried out at 8 worksites in Indiana. Adults 50-75 (N = 209) received one of four messages about colorectal cancer screening: stock, narrative, tailored, tailored narrative. The primary outcome was whether participants filed a colonoscopy claim in the 18 months following the intervention. Individuals receiving narrative messages were 4 times more likely to screen than those not receiving narrative messages. Tailoring did not increase screening behavior overall. However, individuals with higher cancer information overload were 8 times more likely to screen if they received tailored messages. The results suggest that narrative-based approaches are more effective than tailoring at increasing colorectal cancer screening in worksite interventions. Tailoring may be valuable as a strategy for reaching individuals with high overload, perhaps as a follow-up effort to a larger communication campaign.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer information overload; Colonoscopy; Narratives; Randomized controlled trial; Tailoring; United States; Worksite interventions

PMID:
24581059
DOI:
10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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