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West J Emerg Med. 2014 Feb;15(1):26-30. doi: 10.5811/westjem.2013.7.14945.

Social media guidelines and best practices: recommendations from the Council of Residency Directors Social Media Task Force.

Author information

1
Baylor College of Medicine, Section of Emergency Medicine, Houston, Texas.
2
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
4
Mayo Clinic, Department of Emergency Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota.
5
Brody School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Greenville, North Carolina.
6
Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina.
7
Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Emergency Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
8
University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
9
University of California Los Angeles, Department of Emergency Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
10
Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Springfield, Illinois.
11
Ohio State University Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Columbus, Ohio.
12
University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Emergency Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Abstract

Social media has become a staple of everyday life among over one billion people worldwide. A social networking presence has become a hallmark of vibrant and transparent communications. It has quickly become the preferred method of communication and information sharing. It offers the ability for various entities, especially residency programs, to create an attractive internet presence and "brand" the program. Social media, while having significant potential for communication and knowledge transfer, carries with it legal, ethical, personal, and professional risks. Implementation of a social networking presence must be deliberate, transparent, and optimize potential benefits while minimizing risks. This is especially true with residency programs. The power of social media as a communication, education, and recruiting tool is undeniable. Yet the pitfalls of misuse can be disastrous, including violations in patient confidentiality, violations of privacy, and recruiting misconduct. These guidelines were developed to provide emergency medicine residency programs leadership with guidance and best practices in the appropriate use and regulation of social media, but are applicable to all residency programs that wish to establish a social media presence.

PMID:
24578765
PMCID:
PMC3935785
DOI:
10.5811/westjem.2013.7.14945
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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