Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain. 2014 Apr;137(Pt 4):1051-67. doi: 10.1093/brain/awu031. Epub 2014 Feb 27.

Regeneration of diabetic axons is enhanced by selective knockdown of the PTEN gene.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neurosciences and the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus renders both widespread and localized irreversible damage to peripheral axons while imposing critical limitations on their ability to regenerate. A major failure of regenerative capacity thereby imposes a 'double hit' in diabetic patients who frequently develop focal neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome in addition to generalized diffuse polyneuropathy. The mechanisms of diabetic neuron regenerative failure have been speculative and few approaches have offered therapeutic opportunities. In this work we identify an unexpected but major role for PTEN upregulation in diabetic peripheral neurons in attenuating axon regrowth. In chronic diabetic neuropathy models in mice, we identified significant PTEN upregulation in peripheral sensory neurons of messenger RNA and protein compared to littermate controls. In vitro, sensory neurons from these mice responded to PTEN knockdown with substantial rises in neurite outgrowth and branching. To test regenerative plasticity in a chronic diabetic model with established neuropathy, we superimposed an additional focal sciatic nerve crush injury and assessed morphological, electrophysiological and behavioural recovery. Knockdown of PTEN in dorsal root ganglia ipsilateral to the side of injury was achieved using a unique form of non-viral short interfering RNA delivery to the ipsilateral nerve injury site and paw. In comparison with scrambled sequence control short interfering RNA, PTEN short interfering RNA improved several facets of regeneration: recovery of compound muscle action potentials, reflecting numbers of reconnected motor axons to endplates, conduction velocities of both motor and sensory axons, reflecting their maturation during regrowth, numbers and calibre of regenerating myelinated axons distal to the injury site, reinnervation of the skin by unmyelinated epidermal axons and recovery of mechanical sensation. Collectively, these findings identify a novel therapeutic approach, potentially applicable to other neurological conditions requiring specific forms of molecular knockdown, and also identify a unique target, PTEN, to treat diabetic neuroregenerative failure.

KEYWORDS:

axonal injury; diabetes; diabetic polyneuropathy; peripheral nerve; peripheral nervous system

PMID:
24578546
PMCID:
PMC3959560
DOI:
10.1093/brain/awu031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center