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Biofactors. 2014 May-Jun;40(3):346-54. doi: 10.1002/biof.1160. Epub 2014 Feb 27.

A comparative study into alterations of coenzyme Q redox status in ageing pigs, mice, and worms.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Prevention, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Coenzyme Q derivatives (CoQ) are lipid soluble antioxidants that are synthesized endogenously in almost all species and function as an obligatory cofactor of the respiratory chain. There is evidence that CoQ status is altered by age in several species. Here we determined level and redox-state of CoQ in different age groups of pigs, mice and Caenorhabditis elegans. Since these species are very different with respect to lifespan, reproduction and physiology, our approach could provide some general tendencies of CoQ status in ageing organisms. We found that CoQ level decreases with age in pigs and mice, whereas CoQ content increases in older worms. As observed in all three species, ubiquinone, the oxidized form of CoQ, increases with age. Additionally, we were able to show that supplementation of ubiquinol-10, the reduced form of human CoQ10 , slightly increases lifespan of post-reproductive worms. In conclusion, the percentage of the oxidized form of CoQ increases with age indicating higher oxidative stress or rather a decreased anti-oxidative capacity of aged animals.

KEYWORDS:

anti-oxidative capacity; antioxidants; oxidative stress; ubiquinol; ubiquinone

PMID:
24578032
DOI:
10.1002/biof.1160
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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