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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Feb 26;11(3):2395-406. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110302395.

Life gain in Italian smokers who quit.

Author information

1
Pulmonary Unit, CardioThoracic and Vascular Department, University Hospital of Pisa, via Paradisa 2, Cisanello, Pisa 56124, Italy. viegig@ifc.cnr.it.
2
Italian Association of Hospital Pulmonologists (AIPO) Research,Via Antonio Da Recanate, 2, Milan 20124, Italy. franco.falcone@aiporicerche.it.
3
Unit of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute (ISPO), via delle Oblate 2, Florence 50139, Italy. g.carreras@ispo.toscana.it.
4
Unit of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute (ISPO), via delle Oblate 2, Florence 50139, Italy. g.gorini@ispo.toscana.it.
5
Unit of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute (ISPO), via delle Oblate 2, Florence 50139, Italy. a.martini@ispo.toscana.it.
6
Unit of Pulmonary Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Italian National Research Council (IFC-CNR), via Trieste 41, Pisa 56126, Italy. viegig@ifc.cnr.it.

Erratum in

  • Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jun;11(6):5970-4.

Abstract

This study aims to estimate the number of life years gained with quitting smoking in Italian smokers of both sexes, by number of cigarettes smoked per day (cig/day) and age at cessation. All-cause mortality tables by age, sex and smoking status were computed, based on Italian smoking data, and the survival curves of former and current smokers were compared. The more cig/day a man/woman smokes, and the younger his/her age of quitting smoking, the more years of life he/she gains with cessation. In fact, cessation at age 30, 40, 50, or 60 years gained, respectively, about 7, 7, 6, or 5, and 5, 5, 4, or 3 years of life, respectively, for men and women that smoked 10-19 cig/day. The gain in life years was higher for heavy smokers (9 years for >20 cig/day) and lower for light smokers (4 years for 1-9 cig/day). Consistently with prospective studies conducted worldwide, quitting smoking increases life expectancy regardless of age, gender and number of cig/day. The estimates of the number of years of life that could be gained by quitting smoking, when computed specifically for a single smoker, could be used by physicians and health professionals to promote a quit attempt.

PMID:
24577282
PMCID:
PMC3986982
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph110302395
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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