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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2014 Jun;72(6):1119-23. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2013.12.018. Epub 2014 Jan 3.

A rare case of undifferentiated nonkeratinizing carcinoma of the lip mucosa.

Author information

1
Medical Doctor, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Institution of Anatomic Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria S Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy. Electronic address: enrico.pegolo.81@gmail.com.
2
Associate Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medical Sciences, Institution of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria S Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy.
3
Medical Doctor, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medical Sciences, Institution of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria S Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy.
4
Full Professor of Anatomic Pathology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Institution of Anatomic Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria S Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy.

Abstract

Undifferentiated nonkeratinizing carcinoma (UNC) is a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma accompanied by a prominent reactive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate that can occur in many anatomic sites. It shares morphologic features with undifferentiated nonkeratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma, in which a strong association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been noted. Among UNCs arising outside the nasopharynx, the linkage with EBV is variable; in particular, the few cases of UNC of the lip described thus far have been negative for EBV. This report describes a rare case of primary UNC of the lower lip mucosa in a 73-year-old man in whom molecular analysis for EBV showed some amount of viral DNA within the tumor. Surgical excision without adjuvant treatment was performed and the patient was alive without recurrence after 42 months of follow-up. This report presents a rare localization of UNC possibly related to EBV infection and with a good clinical outcome.

PMID:
24576436
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2013.12.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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