Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Med Case Rep. 2014 Feb 28;8:78. doi: 10.1186/1752-1947-8-78.

Sanfilippo type A: new clinical manifestations and neuro-imaging findings in patients from the same family in Israel: a case report.

Author information

1
The Triangle Regional Research and Development Center, P, O, Box-2167, Kfar Qari' 30075, Israel. rajachsharkia@hotmail.com.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Sanfilippo syndrome type A (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA - MPS IIIA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in sulfamidase.

CASE PRESENTATION:

Two daughters (13 and 11 years old) of a consanguineous Palestinian family from the Israeli Arab community were investigated clinically and genetically for the presence of progressive neurodegenerative disease, psychomotor retardation and behavioral abnormalities. Development was normal up to one year of age. Thereafter, progressive motor and speech delay started. Metabolic screening including glycosaminoglycans, karyotype testing and magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Later in the disease, they developed severe spasticity and intellectual disability with autistic features and incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse hypomyelination with thinning of the corpus callosum. Genetic examination through whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation c.416C >T (p.T139M) in the N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) gene. Repeated biochemical testing at age 11 and 13 revealed increased levels of glycosaminoglycans confirming the diagnosis of Sanfilippo syndrome type A.

CONCLUSION:

These cases were considered to be the first report of Sanfilippo syndrome in Israel. We recommend that if similar clinical features are present during childhood, it is preferred to go directly and primarily for a genetic diagnosis of Sanfilippo syndrome, then secondarily for other lysosomal storage disorders that may also be involved.

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center