Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2014 Mar;133(3):393e-404e. doi: 10.1097/01.prs.0000438045.06387.63.

Academic plastic surgery: faculty recruitment and retention.

Author information

1
Madison, Wis.; Rochester, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Iowa City, Iowa; Temple, Texas; Seattle, Wash.; and Indianapolis, Ind. From the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Rochester; Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine; Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Scott and White Healthcare; Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A critical element of a thriving academic plastic surgery program is the quality of faculty. A decline in recruitment and retention of faculty has been attributed to the many challenges of academic medicine. Given the substantial resources required to develop faculty, academic plastic surgery has a vested interest in improving the process of faculty recruitment and retention.

METHODS:

The American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons Issues Committee and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons/Plastic Surgery Foundation Academic Affairs Council surveyed the 83 existing programs in academic plastic surgery in February of 2012. The survey addressed the faculty-related issues in academic plastic surgery programs over the past decade. Recruitment and retention strategies were evaluated. This study was designed to elucidate trends, and define best strategies, on a national level.

RESULTS:

Academic plastic surgery programs have added substantially more full-time faculty over the past decade. Recruitment efforts are multifaceted and can include guaranteed salary support, moving expenses, nurse practitioner/physician's assistant hires, protected time for research, seed funds to start research programs, and more. Retention efforts can include increased compensation, designation of a leadership appointment, protected academic time, and call dilution.

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant change and growth of academic plastic surgery has occurred in the past decade. Effective faculty recruitment and retention are critical to a successful academic center. Funding sources in addition to physician professional fees (institutional program support, grants, contracts, endowment, and so on) are crucial to sustain the academic missions.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center