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Diabetol Metab Syndr. 2014 Feb 26;6(1):27. doi: 10.1186/1758-5996-6-27.

Association of lower limb muscle mass and energy expenditure with visceral fat mass in healthy men.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The University of Tokushima Graduate School of Health Biosciences, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
2
Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Sciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School of Health Biosciences, Tokushima, Japan.
3
Department of Rehabilitation, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan.
4
Department of Medical Education, The University of Tokushima Graduate School of Health Biosciences, Tokushima, Japan.
5
Department of Cardio-Diabetes Medicine, The University of Tokushima Graduate School of Health Biosciences, Tokushima, Japan.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A high-calorie diet and physical inactivity, an imbalance between caloric intake and energy consumption, are major causes of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which manifests as accumulation of visceral fat and insulin resistance. However, the lifestyle-related factors associated with visceral fat mass in healthy men are not fully understood.

METHODS:

We evaluated visceral fat area (VFA), skeletal muscle mass, caloric intake, and energy expenditure in 67 healthy male participants (mean age, 36.9 ± 8.8 years; body mass index 23.4 ± 2.5 kg/m2).

RESULTS:

Multiple regression analysis showed that the total skeletal muscle mass (P < 0.001) were negatively and age (P < 0.001) were positively associated with VFA. Lower limb muscle mass (P < 0.001) was strongly associated with VFA. However, total caloric intake, total energy expenditure, and energy expenditure during exercise were not associated with VFA.

CONCLUSIONS:

Skeletal muscle mass especially lower limb muscle mass negatively contributes to visceral fat mass in healthy men. Therefore, maintaining lower limb muscular fitness through daily activity may be a useful strategy for controlling visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome.

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