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Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2014 Feb;16(2):174-80.

[A splicing mutation of EXT1 in a Chinese pedigree with hereditary multiple exostoses].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of Peadiatrics, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100005, China. songhm1021@hotmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) is an autosomal dominant monogenic disorder of paraplasia ossium. Mutations in EXT1 and EXT2 have been suggested to be responsible for over 70% of HME cases. This study aimed to analyze the clinical features and pathogenic mutations in a Chinese family with HME (6 patients in 24 members of 3 generations) and to review the relative literature regarding mutations in EXT1 and EXT2 in the Chinese population.

METHODS:

Clinical pedigree dada from a Chinese family of HME were collected and analysed. EXT gene mutations in this pedigree assessed by PCR and sequencing. Pubmed and Wanfang (a Chinese database) were searched for the literature related to gene mutations in Chinese HME patients.

RESULTS:

In the pedigree analyzed, the age of onset of HME was becoming younger, the disease was becoming more severe, and the number of osteochondromas was increasing, in successive generations. A splicing mutation IVS5+1G>A, first identified in Chinese population, was found in all diseased members of this pedigree. According the currently available literature, EXT1 and EXT2 mutations have been detected in 29% (26/90) and 43% (39/90) Chinese families with HME.

CONCLUSIONS:

HME starts earlier and becomes more severe and extensive with each successive generation in members of the pedigree analyzed. A splicing mutation, IVS5+1G>A, of EXT1, first identified in Chinese population, may be responsible for HME in the studied pedigree. EXT1 and EXT2 mutation rates may be different between the Chinese and Western populations.

PMID:
24568913
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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