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Clin Cardiol. 2014 Jan;37(1):57-65.

The effects of continuous positive airways pressure therapy on cardiovascular end points in patients with sleep-disordered breathing and heart failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Abstract

In patients with sleep-disordered breathing and heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure has been found to be associated with an improvement in cardiovascular end points. We conducted a systematic review of the current literature and a meta-analysis to pool data from 15 published randomized controlled trials. End points analyzed were left ventricular ejection fraction, diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and mortality. A fixed effects model was used for end points demonstrating homogeneity among included studies, whereas a random effects model was used for end points demonstrating heterogeneity among included studies. A significant improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction was noted with continuous positive airway pressure (mean difference, 5.05%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72 to 6.38), diastolic blood pressure (mean difference, −1.67; 95% CI: −3.09 to −0.25), and heart rate (mean difference, −5.92; 95% CI: −10.12 to−1.72). No significant changes in mortality (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% CI: 0.40 to 1.00) and systolic blood pressure were noted (mean difference, −6.35; 95% CI: −16.11 to 2.41). The analysis also revealed the need for additional studies to clarify the associations noted and the presence of publication bias with small studies with a paucity of small studies with negative results. In this meta-analysis, treatment with continuous positive airways pressure was associated with improvements in ejection fraction, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate in patients with sleep-disordered breathing and congestive heart failure.

PMID:
24567977
PMCID:
PMC6649374
DOI:
10.1002/clc.22201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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