Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Oncol. 2014 Apr 10;32(11):1151-6. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2013.52.8877. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

Prospective study of fertility concerns and preservation strategies in young women with breast cancer.

Author information

1
Kathryn J. Ruddy, Shari I. Gelber, Meghan E. Meyer, and Ann H. Partridge, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Rulla M. Tamimi and Elizabeth S. Ginsburg, Brigham and Women's Hospital; Lidia Schapira, Massachusetts General Hospital; Steven E. Come, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA; and Virginia F. Borges, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Most research regarding fertility in young women with breast cancer has focused on long-term survivors. Little is known about how fertility concerns affect treatment decisions or fertility preservation strategies at the time of initial cancer diagnosis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

As part of an ongoing prospective multicenter cohort study, we surveyed women with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer at age ≤ 40 years. The baseline survey included sociodemographic, medical, and treatment data as well as a modified Fertility Issues Survey, including fertility concern and preservation items. Univariable and multivariable modeling were used to investigate predictors of greater fertility concern.

RESULTS:

Among the first 620 eligible respondents included in this analysis, median age was 37 years (range, 17 to 40 years); 425 women (68%) discussed fertility issues with their physicians before starting therapy, and 319 (51%) were concerned about becoming infertile after treatment. Because of concerns about fertility, four women (1%) chose not to receive chemotherapy, 12 (2%) chose one chemotherapy regimen over another, six (1%) considered not receiving endocrine therapy, 19 (3%) decided not to receive endocrine therapy, and 71 (11%) considered receiving endocrine therapy for < 5 years; 65 (10%) used fertility preservation strategies. Greater concern about fertility was associated with younger age, nonwhite race, not having children, and receipt of chemotherapy.

CONCLUSION:

Many young women with newly diagnosed breast cancer have concerns about fertility, and for some, these substantially affect their treatment decisions. Only a minority of women currently pursue available fertility preservation strategies in this setting.

PMID:
24567428
PMCID:
PMC4164759
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.2013.52.8877
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center