Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Epilepsy Behav. 2014 Mar;32:135-41. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.01.016. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Healthcare utilization and costs in children with stable and uncontrolled epilepsy.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Consultant, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: joyce.cramer@gmail.com.
2
Eisai Inc., 100 Tice Boulevard, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677, USA. Electronic address: Jason_Wang@eisai.com.
3
Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, 280 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 404, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, USA. Electronic address: echang@pharllc.com.
4
Eisai Inc., 100 Tice Boulevard, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677, USA. Electronic address: Annette_Powers@eisai.com.
5
Eisai Inc., 100 Tice Boulevard, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677, USA. Electronic address: Ronda_Copher@eisai.com.
6
Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, 280 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 404, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, USA. Electronic address: dasha@pharllc.com.
7
Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, 280 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 404, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, USA. Electronic address: mbroder@pharllc.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Epilepsy adversely affects childhood development, possibly leading to increased economic burden in pediatric populations. We compared annual healthcare utilization and costs between children (<12 years old) with stable and uncontrolled epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).

METHODS:

Children (<12 years old) with epilepsy (ICD-9-CM 345.xx or 780.39) in 2008 were identified in the MarketScan claims database from 2007 to 2009. Patients with "stable" epilepsy used the same AED for ≥12 months, and patients with "uncontrolled" epilepsy were prescribed additional AED(s) during that period. For patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, the study index date was the start of additional AED(s); for patients with stable epilepsy, the study index date was a random AED fill date. Epilepsy-related utilization included medical services with 345.xx or 780.39 in any diagnosis field and AED fills. Epilepsy-related costs included AEDs, medical claims with epilepsy in any diagnosis field, and certain tests. We adjusted for baseline cohort differences (demographics, region, usual-care physician specialty, and comorbidities) using logistic regression and analysis of covariance.

RESULTS:

Two thousand one hundred seventy patients were identified (mean: 7.5 years; 45.3% were female; Charlson comorbidity index: 0.3; 422 (19.4%) patients with uncontrolled epilepsy). Patients with uncontrolled epilepsy faced more hospitalizations (30.1% vs. 12.0%) and greater overall ($30,343 vs. $18,206) and epilepsy-related costs ($16,894 vs. $7979) (all p<.001). Adjusting for baseline measures, patients with uncontrolled epilepsy had greater odds of hospitalization (OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.9-3.3) and costs (overall: $3908, p=.087; epilepsy-related: $5744, p<.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with uncontrolled epilepsy use significantly more healthcare resources and have a greater economic burden than children with stable epilepsy. However, epilepsy accounted for only half of overall costs, indicating that comorbid conditions may add substantially to the disease burden.

KEYWORDS:

Antiepileptic drugs; Children; Comorbidities; Cost analysis; Economics; Epilepsy; Medical care; Pediatric epilepsy; Seizures

PMID:
24561658
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.01.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center