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Neurobiol Aging. 2014 Jul;35(7):1660-8. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.01.135. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Longitudinal neurochemical modifications in the aging mouse brain measured in vivo by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Functional and Metabolic Imaging, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Radiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: joao.duarte@epfl.ch.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Laboratory for Functional and Metabolic Imaging, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Radiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Radiology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

Alterations to brain homeostasis during development are reflected in the neurochemical profile determined noninvasively by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We determined longitudinal biochemical modifications in the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of C57BL/6 mice aged between 3 and 24 months . The regional neurochemical profile evolution indicated that aging induces general modifications of neurotransmission processes (reduced GABA and glutamate), primary energy metabolism (altered glucose, alanine, and lactate) and turnover of lipid membranes (modification of choline-containing compounds and phosphorylethanolamine), which are all probably involved in the frequently observed age-related cognitive decline. Interestingly, the neurochemical profile was different in male and female mice, particularly in the levels of taurine that may be under the control of estrogen receptors. These neurochemical profiles constitute the basal concentrations in cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of healthy aging male and female mice.

KEYWORDS:

(1)H MRS; Aging; Biomarkers; Brain; Metabolism; Neurochemical profile

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