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Ann Surg Oncol. 2014 Jun;21(6):2028-35. doi: 10.1245/s10434-014-3520-1. Epub 2014 Feb 21.

Feasibility and nutritional impact of laparoscopy-assisted subtotal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the upper stomach.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Gastroenterological Center, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy (LATG) is commonly performed for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach; however, the incidence of anastomotic complications remains high, and postoperative nutritional status is not satisfactory. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and nutritional impact of a novel surgical procedure, laparoscopy-assisted subtotal gastrectomy (LAsTG).

METHODS:

This was a retrospective study of 167 patients with EGC in the upper stomach. Of these, 57 patients underwent LAsTG, while 110 patients underwent LATG. Postoperative change in body weight, and serum concentration of albumin (Alb) and total protein (TP) were compared between the LAsTG and LATG groups. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to assess the influence of potential confounding factors.

RESULTS:

Frequency of anastomotic complications was significantly higher in the LATG group (16.3 %) than in the LAsTG group (5.3 %, P = 0.040). Postoperative recovery of body weight at 12 months after surgery was significantly better in the LAsTG group (89.8 ± 1.4 %) than in the LATG group (82.1 ± 1.0 %, P < 0.001). By ANCOVA, adjusted mean differences of Alb and TP at 12 months after surgery between the LAsTG and LATG groups were 0.226 g/dl (95 % CI 0.141-0.312; P < 0.001) and 0.380 g/dl (95 % CI 0.265-0.495; P < 0.001); thus, the surgical procedure was significantly associated with the postoperative Alb and TP levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

LAsTG could be a better choice than LATG for EGC in the upper stomach as a result of improvements in the incidence of anastomotic complications and postoperative nutritional status.

PMID:
24558062
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-014-3520-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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