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Acad Med. 2014 Apr;89(4):678-88. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000000162.

Applying established guidelines to team-based learning programs in medical schools: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Dr. Burgess is executive officer, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Ms. McGregor is research project officer, Workforce Education and Development Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Professor Mellis is professor of medicine and associate dean, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Team-based learning (TBL), a structured form of small-group learning, has gained popularity in medical education in recent years. A growing number of medical schools have adopted TBL in a variety of combinations and permutations across a diversity of settings, learners, and content areas. The authors conducted this systematic review to establish the extent, design, and practice of TBL programs within medical schools to inform curriculum planners and education designers.

METHOD:

The authors searched the MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and ERIC databases for articles on TBL in undergraduate medical education published between 2002 and 2012. They selected and reviewed articles that included original research on TBL programs and assessed the articles according to the seven core TBL design elements (team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the four S's [significant problem, same problem, specific choice, and simultaneous reporting], incentive structure, and peer review) described in established guidelines.

RESULTS:

The authors identified 20 articles that satisfied the inclusion criteria. They found significant variability across the articles in terms of the application of the seven core design elements and the depth with which they were described. The majority of the articles, however, reported that TBL provided a positive learning experience for students.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the future, faculty should adhere to a standardized TBL framework to better understand the impact and relative merits of each feature of their program.

PMID:
24556770
PMCID:
PMC4885587
DOI:
10.1097/ACM.0000000000000162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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