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Sensors (Basel). 2014 Feb 19;14(2):3293-307. doi: 10.3390/s140203293.

Vertical dynamic deflection measurement in concrete beams with the Microsoft Kinect.

Author information

1
Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada. xiqi@ucalgary.ca.
2
Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada. ddlichti@ucalgary.ca.
3
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada. melbadry@ucalgary.ca.
4
Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada. jckchow@ucalgary.ca.
5
Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada. kdang@ucalgary.ca.

Abstract

The Microsoft Kinect is arguably the most popular RGB-D camera currently on the market, partially due to its low cost. It offers many advantages for the measurement of dynamic phenomena since it can directly measure three-dimensional coordinates of objects at video frame rate using a single sensor. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the development of a Microsoft Kinect-based system for measuring the deflection of reinforced concrete beams subjected to cyclic loads. New segmentation methods for object extraction from the Kinect's depth imagery and vertical displacement reconstruction algorithms have been developed and implemented to reconstruct the time-dependent displacement of concrete beams tested in laboratory conditions. The results demonstrate that the amplitude and frequency of the vertical displacements can be reconstructed with submillimetre and milliHz-level precision and accuracy, respectively.

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