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Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Feb 20;11:E26. doi: 10.5888/pcd11.130299.

Understanding and use of nicotine replacement therapy and nonpharmacologic smoking cessation strategies among Chinese and Vietnamese smokers and their families.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, 401 Parnassus Ave (0984-TRC), San Francisco, CA 94143. E-mail: janice.tsoh@ucsf.edu.
3
Chinese Community Health Resource Center, San Francisco, California.
4
South East Asian Community Center, San Francisco, California.
5
University of California, San Francisco, and Asian American Research Center on Health, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Population-based studies have reported high rates of smoking prevalence among Chinese and Vietnamese American men. Although nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is effective, recommended, and accessible without prescription, these populations underuse NRT for smoking cessation. The aim of this study was to assess understanding and use of NRT and nonpharmacologic treatments among Chinese and Vietnamese American male smokers and their families.

METHODS:

In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 smoker-family pairs, followed by individual interviews with each participant. A total of 39 interviews were conducted in Vietnamese or Chinese, recorded, translated, and transcribed into English for analysis.

RESULTS:

Four themes were identified: use and understanding of NRT, nonpharmacologic strategies, familial and religious approaches, and willpower. Both smokers and their family members believed strongly in willpower and a sense of personal responsibility as the primary drivers for stopping smoking. Lack of these 2 qualities keeps many Chinese and Vietnamese men from using NRT to quit smoking. Those who do use NRT often use it incorrectly, following their own preferences rather than product instructions.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate the importance of culturally appropriate patient education about NRT. It may be necessary to teach smokers and their families at an individual level about NRT as a complementary approach that can strengthen their resolve to quit smoking. At a community level, public health education on the indication and appropriate use of evidence-based smoking cessation resources, such as NRT, would be an important component of effective tobacco control.

PMID:
24556252
PMCID:
PMC3938957
DOI:
10.5888/pcd11.130299
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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