Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Phys Ther Sport. 2014 Aug;15(3):194-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.11.004. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Normative data for the Functional Movement Screen in male Gaelic field sports.

Author information

1
UCD, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy & Population Science, Dublin 4, Belfield, Ireland. Electronic address: domhnaill.fox@ucdconnect.ie.
2
UCD, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy & Population Science, Dublin 4, Belfield, Ireland. Electronic address: edweniaomalley@hotmail.com.
3
UCD, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy & Population Science, Dublin 4, Belfield, Ireland. Electronic address: c.blake@ucd.ie.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine normative values for the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) in Elite and Sub-Elite male Gaelic Football and Hurling players.

DESIGN:

A cross sectional study of functional movement in Gaelic games at Elite and Sub-Elite level. Players were video recorded completing the Functional Movement Screen Tool and scored post-test. Comparisons were analysed using Mann-Whitney U tests.

SETTING:

Field testing in team gym facility and university biomechanics laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 62 players were tested. This consisted of 41 Hurling, and 21 Gaelic Football players. 30 of these participants were deemed Elite and 32 were deemed Sub-Elite. The mean age of the sample was 22.15 ± 3.02 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Functional Movement Screen (FMS).

RESULTS:

The FMS mean score for the sample was 15.56 ± 1.46. The Elite group (15.8 ± 1.58) scored higher than the Sub-Elite group (15.34 ± 1.31) but there was no significant difference between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides normative reference values for Gaelic Players. Elite Gaelic Players perform no better than a young, active population in the FMS indicating a potential problem with the FMS as a measure.

KEYWORDS:

Functional movement screen; Injury risk; Performance; Physical therapy; Screening

PMID:
24556034
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center