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Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:60-6. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.02.005. Epub 2014 Feb 17.

Acute stress reduces speech fluency.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Saint Louis University, United States. Electronic address: Tbuchan7@slu.edu.
2
Communication Sciences & Disorders Program and Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, United States.
3
Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders and Neurology, University of Iowa, United States.

Erratum in

  • Biol Psychol. 2014 Jul;100:122.

Abstract

People often report word-finding difficulties and other language disturbances when put in a stressful situation. There is, however, scant empirical evidence to support the claim that stress affects speech productivity. To address this issue, we measured speech and language variables during a stressful Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) as well as during a less stressful "placebo" TSST (Het et al., 2009). Compared to the non-stressful speech, participants showed higher word productivity during the TSST. By contrast, participants paused more during the stressful TSST, an effect that was especially pronounced in participants who produced a larger cortisol and heart rate response to the stressor. Findings support anecdotal evidence of stress-impaired speech production abilities.

KEYWORDS:

Cortisol; Language; Speech; Stress

PMID:
24555989
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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