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BMC Public Health. 2014 Feb 20;14:184. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-184.

Socioeconomic position across the lifecourse & allostatic load: data from the West of Scotland Twenty-07 cohort study.

Author information

1
Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy, University of Edinburgh, 20 West Richmond Street, Edinburgh EH8 9DX, UK. tony.robertson@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined how socioeconomic position (SEP) across the lifecourse (three critical periods, social mobility and accumulated over time) is associated with allostatic load (a measure of cumulative physiological burden).

METHODS:

Data are from the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study, with respondents aged 35 (n = 740), 55 (n = 817) and 75 (n = 483). SEP measures representing childhood, the transition to adulthood and adulthood SEP were used. Allostatic load was produced by summing nine binary biomarker scores (1 = in the highest-risk quartile). Linear regressions were used for each of the lifecourse models; with model fits compared using partial F-tests.

RESULTS:

For those aged 35 and 55, higher SEP was associated with lower allostatic load (no association in the 75-year-olds). The accumulation model (more time spent with higher SEP) had the best model fit in those aged 35 (b = -0.50, 95%CI = -0.68, -0.32, P = 0.002) and 55 (b = -0.31, 95%CI = -0.49, -0.12, P < 0.001). However, the relative contributions of each life-stage differed, with adulthood SEP less strongly associated with allostatic load.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term, accumulated higher SEP has been shown to be associated with lower allostatic load (less physiological burden). However, the transition to adulthood may represent a particularly sensitive period for SEP to impact on allostatic load.

PMID:
24555560
PMCID:
PMC3942053
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-14-184
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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